60s metal and wenge veneer sideboard for Mauser Werke Waldeck

950.00

60s metal and wenge veneer sideboard for Mauser Werke Waldeck

950.00

Designer
Mauser home
Manufacturer
Mauser Werke Waldeck
Period
1960s
Origin
Germany
Material
Metal, wenge veneer
Color
Grey, Red, Wengé
Code
09290420KD
Condition
Good condition consistent with age and use.
Dimensions
156cm (w) x 43cm (d) x 93cm (h)
WS
A - B
Price
€ 950,- | $ 1.078,-
Comment
See writing below.

Alfons Mauser founded a factory for sheet steel products, steel grilles, garden gates and fence elements at the age of 24 in 1896 in Oberndorf am Neckar, which he sold under the name Wren.
In 1921 Mauser acquired a former carbide factory in the Hessian town of Waldeck, which he redesigned with production lines for steel drums. The company flourished and became one of the largest employers in the region. Soon gas bottles, containers, tanks and a variety of agricultural products were also manufactured here. In 1922, Mauser relocated the company headquarters from Cologne-Ehrenfeld to Brühl in the Rhineland and renamed the company to Mauser-Werke GmbH. Alfons Mauser died in 1927 at the age of 55. His five sons continued to run the company as a family holding company. After Mauser’s death, the Alfons and Maria Mauserstiftung was established, which was committed to the social concerns of employees and their relatives.

The generation of sons diversified the company’s product range. In 1929, the production of steel furniture began at the Waldeck plant, and barrel production was also expanded. Large production facilities were set up in Harburg, Neuwied and Herdecke, and subsidiaries in Brazil (Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo), Portugal (Sapem / Lisbon) and the Netherlands (Vreeland plant) also manufactured Mauser patent drums. From 1930 onwards, the Mauser-Werke manufactured cantilever tubular steel chairs according to their own designs, which, however, could not deny their design closeness to Bauhaus designs. This was followed by lengthy legal disputes with various patent holders such as Mies van der Rohe (1936) and after the Second World War with the furniture manufacturer Thonet, which competed in the design segment (until 1961).

In the course of the relocation of armaments factories essential to the war, the Henschel aircraft engine factories moved into the production halls of Waldeck in 1944, for which barrel production had to be stopped. After the war, Mauser-Werke used the barrel and barrel production lines that had been previously stored due to the switch to war production to produce high-quality furniture and office equipment. The Mauser Rundform program offered desks, conference tables, club tables and filing cabinets. Tubular steel seating elements such as single chairs and multi-seat club benches were manufactured at the Waldeck plant. At the beginning of the 1950s, the Mauser dragonfly (Walter Papst design) and the Mauser butterfly, which became design icons of the post-war period, came onto the market. The mid-century modern furniture produced by Mauser since 1929 are sought-after design classics today. In 1953 the company built its own office furniture plant in Korbach. In 1997, Mauser was still the leading manufacturer of office furniture in Germany.
In 1979, Mauser-Werke GmbH changed into Mauser-Waldeck Aktiengesellschaft in the course of a capital increase. The Mauser family of entrepreneurs parted company with their shares, which resulted in changing majority relationships among the owners and different product and company strategies.Among others, the Rothenberger Group (1988–1992), Rheinmetall (1992–2000) and Ahrend NV (2000–2002) were involved.
The product range of Mauser Waldeck AG has become smaller over the years because lines have been partially discontinued or integrated into new owner companies. And finally the furniture plant in Waldeck stopped around 2002.

Worldwide shipping