80s Poul Kjaerholm PK22 bordeaux/cognac fauteuil for Fritz Hansen set/2

Designer
Poul Kjaerholm
Manufacturer
Fritz Hansen
Period
1984
Origin
Denemarken
Material
Stainless steel, leather
Color
Bordeaux cognac
Code
1226047ZF
Condition
Good
Dimensions
63cm (w) x 65cm (d) x 72,5vm h) | seath 29cm
Price
sold, located Amsterdam
Comment
Find more info about Kjaerholm below

Poul Kjaerholm PK22

“The important thing is to express the personality of the material – not mine” Poul Kjaerholm

Danish designer Poul Kjaerholm was a trained carpenter and continued his studies at the School of Arts and Crafts in Copenhagen where he graduated in 1952.

Kjaerholm’s furniture designs were characterized by a simple aesthetic that stripped away ornament in favor of clean lines and materials-based beauty. He had a particular interest in different construction materials; especially steel which he considered a natural material with the same artistic fineness as other natural materials.He used steel frames extensively in his work, often in combination with natural materials such as wood, cane, and leather, and was a strong proponent of industrial production.

Kjaerholm designed dozens of chairs and tables, including the iconic PK22 and PK24 chairs and the PK61 coffee table, and E. Kold Christensen and Fritz Hansen produced several of his designs. His myriad awards include the Grand Prix at the Milan Trienale (in both 1957 & 1960) and the Lunning Award (1958). Kjaerholm’s designs are in the permanent collections of major museums across the globe. In 2006, he was the subject of a major retrospective at Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art.

PK22 lounge chair

Poul Kjaerholm designed the PK22 chair in 1956 for furniture manufacturer Fritz Hansen. Its reduced, minimalist expression, clearly influenced by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Chair, communicates simple elegance and set a new standard for Scandinavian furniture design.

In designing his PK22 chair, Poul Kjaerholm considered every last detail. He was determined to bring to bear the experience he had gained in designing the PK25 Armchair, optimising levels of comfort. He went on to revisit the aims of the PK22 in a number of his subsequent designs, for example his PK24 Chaise Longue (1965) and the PK29 Lounge Chair (1967), both of which echo the characteristic elegant lines of the PK22 chair.

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